Google launches 360-imagery of the ISS. How cool is that? Google launches 360-imagery of the ISS. How cool is that?
Google has just released Street View’s first gravity-free collection – letting you virtually explore the International Space Station (ISS) in 360-degree imagery from Google Maps... Google launches 360-imagery of the ISS. How cool is that?

Google has just released Street View’s first gravity-free collection – letting you virtually explore the International Space Station (ISS) in 360-degree imagery from Google Maps and Earth. The ISS in Street View was captured in partnership with NASA, ESA, JAXA, Roscosmos and CASIS.

With this launch, Google users can now tour all 15 modules of the ISS. This is the first Street View collection with annotations, a feature previously only available for Google Arts & Culture museums. Now, as you walk through the modules of the ISS in Google Maps, you’ll see clear and useful annotations highlighting things like where the astronauts work out to stay physically fit, what kind of food they eat, and where they do scientific experiments.

Street View started out as Larry Page’s far-fetched idea to create a 360-degree map of the world and Google recently celebrated 10 years of beautiful imagery from around the world.

Today, people can scale mountains, dive into the depths of the ocean, scout out ramen spots, and walk through museums in far corners of the world.

“Over the last decade, a lot has changed – the technology we use, the appearance of the planet – but the goal of Google Maps has remained the same: to help you navigate and discover new corners of the Earth and now beyond,” said Google in a statement.

Since November 2000, the International Space Station has been home to astronauts from around the world, studying what happens to people when they live and work in space.

Several countries worked together to build and use the ISS; the spacecraft houses science labs from the United States, Japan, Russia and Europe.

You can actually see the ISS from Earth – its orbit is about 220 miles above our planet. Visit NASA’s <Spot the Station> website to learn when and where you can see the space station next.

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